Jean-Christophe Blanchard (Nancy): The use of heraldic images by the patricians of Metz and by the recently ennobled men of the princes of Bar and Lorraine (15th century)

Feudal nobility and ruling dynasties are social categories which we would expect to use heraldry in order to claim their power and to communicate their ideas. But the patricians of Metz (a free imperial city) and the recently ennobled men of the princes of Bar and Lorraine were among the more frequent users of such images: the former to stand up to the local princes and neighbouring feudal nobility, and the latter make a display of their new condition. To explore the use of heraldry in Metz we will draw on the armorial of André de Rineck and the testimony of the well-known chronicle writer Philippe de Vigneulles. The books of hours could also serve our purpose in the context of Metz, but those manuscripts, with other works of art, will be the basis of our study of the ways recently ennobled families advertised their new condition through their names and coats of arms, attempting to guarantee a visibility of their new lineage.

Date:  1 July 2013
Place: International Medieval Congress, Leeds,Session 207 (Medieval Heraldry
Revisited II: Between city and nobility. Heraldry and the question of status
)

Cite the article as: Torsten Hiltmann, "Jean-Christophe Blanchard (Nancy): The use of heraldic images by the patricians of Metz and by the recently ennobled men of the princes of Bar and Lorraine (15th century)", in: Heraldica Nova: Medieval and Early Modern Heraldry from the Perspective of Cultural History (a Hypotheses.org blog), published: 11/06/2013, Internet: http://heraldica.hypotheses.org/195.

Torsten Hiltmann

Torsten Hiltmann is Juniorprofessor for the High and Late Middle Ages and Auxiliary Sciences at the University of Münster. He is interested in new approaches to late medieval and early modern heraldry, the medieval notion of kingship and the methods and technologies of Digital Humanities. On hypotheses.org, he is maintaining, among others, the blog “Heraldica Nova”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *