Category: Articles

Pounder memorial (1525) in Ipswich. 0

Heraldry is Vanity! Moral Criticism of Heraldic Commemoration in Germany – A European Phenomenon?

Medieval churches still abound in coats of arms depicted on tombs, epitaphs, windows, altarpieces and other commemorative devices. And of course it was not just knights, nobles, princes and kings that tried to preserve their memory by means of heraldry. Medieval townspeople, too, left behind heraldic reminders in the churches in England and Germany, for instance. The Nuremberg patrician Sebald Schreyer (d. 1520) noted a stained-glass window embellished with...

8

Das „Bassenheimer Wappenbuch“ und das „Hofwappenbuch Herzog Ferdinands von Bayern 1544 – 1607“

In Gustav A. Seylers (1846-1935) süddeutschen Siebmacherbänden (Adel und Bürgerliche) findet man als Quellenangabe häufiger den Verweis auf das „Bassenheimer Wappenbuch“ und auf das „Hofwappenbuch“. Letzteres lässt sich relativ einfach identifizieren. Schließlich schreibt Seyler 1912 selbst im Bande 9 des Bürgerlichen Wappenbuches: In diesem Werke, namentlich in den Teilen III u. IV ist vielfach „des Herzogs Ferdinand von Bajern Hofwappenbuch“ als Quelle namhaft gemacht. Ich halte mich für verpflichtet,...

0

Miguel Metelo de Seixas professeur invité à l’Ecole pratique des Hautes Etudes Paris, 16 à 26 janvier 2018

En janvier 2018, Miguel Metelo de Seixas, spécialiste bien connu d’emblématique et d’héraldique portugaise, séjourne à Paris comme professeur invité de la chaire d’emblématique occidentale de l’Ecole pratique des Hautes Etudes – Paris Sciences et Lettres. Il interviendra a quatre reprises, notamment dans le cadre de la conférence mensuelle de la Société française d’héraldique et de sigillographie et dans celui des conférences de Laurent Hablot. Nous espérons qu’un public...

Visible Identites conference, London. (2017) 0

[Report:] Visible Identities: Symbolic Codes from Personal Heraldry to Corporate Logos, London, 6 November 2017

It is a convenient coincidence that an event of this thematic scope took place in London, a city that is home to the College of Arms as the oldest authority of heraldry as a century-old tradition of visual identification on the one, and the headquarters of countless companies concerned with identity of modern global brands on the other side. With these two dimensions in mind, this symposium brought together...

3

A few more armorials online (Mandragore database)

The Mandragore database of the Bibliothèque national in Paris (http://mandragore.bnf.fr/jsp/rechercheExperte.jsp) allows one to search images of the BnF’s illuminated manuscripts. Unsurprisingly perhaps, this also brings to light a rather larger number of heraldic images (some 10,000 images are tagged ‘armoiries’) and at least a few armorials: 18 manuscripts in the database have been described as armorials (i.e. have the word ‘armorial’ in the modern title). Here’s a list: 1...

Lamp from the emir Aydakin Al Bunduqdar’s mausoleum. 12

The Mamluk rank: Quasi-heraldic emblems in the Islamic world

In Islamic culture, ‘mamluks’ were elite slave soldiers that served the Muslim caliphs, sultans and emirs. Recruited at a young age from the Turkish tribes of the steppes of central Asia, they first appeared in the ninth century under the Abbasid caliph Al-Mutasim near Baghdad. By the thirteenth century, buying and training mamluks had become a common practice in the Middle East. In Egypt, the first sultan to make...

Visible Identites conference, London. (2017) 0

[CfA:] Visible Identities: Symbolic Codes from Personal Heraldry to Corporate Logos, London, 6 November 2017 (Programme)

This day conference at the Society of Antiquaries will consider the ways in which identity since c. 1100 has been, and continues to be, expressed in outward visible formats, principally heraldry. The opening address will be delivered by Claire Boudreau, Chief Herald of Canada, on development of the country’s visual symbolic identity. The following contributions will consider the development of sign systems of identity and their uses from the...

5

Bellenville’s two armorials

The »Bellenville« armorial is one of the most famous and admired of the Middle Ages. Its production context however remains shrouded in mystery. This brief blogpost discusses the relations between its two main sections and demonstrates how focus on the material aspects of the manuscript can clarify a somewhat confusing statement in the most recent heraldic edition of the armorial. The manuscript The manuscript with the »Bellenville« armorial consists...

0

Heraldry in the royal palace of Sintra: ‘In the Service of the Crown’ project on national TV in Portugal

The show Visita Guiada (‘Guided Visit’) by Portuguese journalist Paula Moura Pinheiro is currently the most popular program of Portugal’s public broadcasting channel RTP 2. Every week, a Portuguese monument of cultural importance is presented by a specialist, generally a historian. Last week, the chosen monument was the royal palace in Sintra and its sala dos brasões (‘hall of coats of arms’). It was presented by Miguel Metelo de...

2

Recent publications – Update May 2017

Books Barbattini, R., M. Ghirardi and G. Giovinazzo, Api delle città. La figura dell’ape nell’araldica civica italiana (San Godenzo, 2016) Büchner, Robert, Das Münchner Boten- und Wappenbuch vom Arlberg (Frankfurt, 2016) Fragale, Luca Irwin, Microstoria e Araldica di Calabria Citeriore e di Cosenza. Da fonti documentarie inedite (Milano, 2016) Articles and chapters Barovier Mentasti, R., L. Borelli, C. Tonini, ‘Dating the Venetian Rovere Flask at The Corning Museum of...

46

[Question:] Dear heraldists, we need your input: How did you learn to blazon?

Dear heraldists, dear fellow researchers, As a part of my studies, I am looking at concepts of ‚proper‘ blazon in general, and differences and parallels between the English, French, and German systems and traditions of blazoning in particular. For example, I plan to do some work on the ways in which heraldic ordinaries and charges are categorised and the rationale behind these categorisations. In this context, I am curious...

0

A dream’s armorial: The heraldic paintings of the Galleria dei Papi in Oriolo Romano (Viterbo, Italy)

In central Italy, between Rome and Viterbo, a land of forests frequented and feared for millennia[1] includes a town of dreams. This is Oriolo Romano, built in 1562 by the roman nobleman Giorgio Santacroce who gave stable accommodation to the seasonal huts of lumberjacks by a new town in line with Renaissance ideals. Three parallel streets converge on the square of the princely building in a trident structure similar to...