Category: English

0

Recent publications – Update May 2017

Books Barbattini, R., M. Ghirardi and G. Giovinazzo, Api delle città. La figura dell’ape nell’araldica civica italiana (San Godenzo, 2016) Büchner, Robert, Das Münchner Boten- und Wappenbuch vom Arlberg (Frankfurt, 2016) Fragale, Luca Irwin, Microstoria e Araldica di Calabria Citeriore e di Cosenza. Da fonti documentarie inedite (Milano, 2016) Articles and chapters Barovier Mentasti, R., L. Borelli, C. Tonini, ‘Dating the Venetian Rovere Flask at The Corning Museum of...

46

[Question:] Dear heraldists, we need your input: How did you learn to blazon?

Dear heraldists, dear fellow researchers, As a part of my studies, I am looking at concepts of ‚proper‘ blazon in general, and differences and parallels between the English, French, and German systems and traditions of blazoning in particular. For example, I plan to do some work on the ways in which heraldic ordinaries and charges are categorised and the rationale behind these categorisations. In this context, I am curious...

0

A dream’s armorial: The heraldic paintings of the Galleria dei Papi in Oriolo Romano (Viterbo, Italy)

In central Italy, between Rome and Viterbo, a land of forests frequented and feared for millennia[1] includes a town of dreams. This is Oriolo Romano, built in 1562 by the roman nobleman Giorgio Santacroce who gave stable accommodation to the seasonal huts of lumberjacks by a new town in line with Renaissance ideals. Three parallel streets converge on the square of the princely building in a trident structure similar to...

4

A world (map) of coat of arms: Richental’s mappamundi

The Aulendorf copy of Richental’s chronicle, today preserved in New York, is rightly famous as an important textual witness not only of the chronicle but also the armorial transmitted with the latter (see https://heraldica.hypotheses.org/2854 on the manuscript and the coats of arms it contains). Today, I would like to draw attention to a slightly hidden feature of the Aulendorf manuscript, namely the mappamundi it contains – a so-called ‘T-O...

0

[Paper:] Milton Pacheco(Coimbra): A king between gods and heroes: The iconographic program of the Palace of Ribeira throne room during the reform of D. Filipe I of Portugal

When in 1581 king Phillip II of Spain was acclaimed sovereign of the Portuguese Empire as D. Filipe I of Portugal, he spent the first three years in the kingdom in order to reorganize it according to his personal administrative requirements and political needs. Determined to restructured the new realm in his own image, as the powerful ruler of the vast Spanish Habsburg Empire, which would thoroughly increase extremely...

0

[Paper:] Francesca Tasso, Tosi Luca (Milan, I): Sala dei Moroni in the so called Cortile Ducale (Ducal Courtyard) in Castello Sforzesco

1498 Ludovico il Moro, Lord of Milano, Italy, committed to Leonardo da Vinci the painted decoration of one of the rooms of his court palace, the so called Sala delle Asse. Recent researches, connected to the current restoration, let understand that Leonardo celebrated Ludovico with a wide pavilion of 16 trees of mulberries, whose branches were connected in the ceiling. The mulberry was chosen as an original and modern...

1

[Paper:] Laura Cirri (Florence, I): The use of the imprese in the Medicean iconography of power: evolution and consolidation through the 15th and 16th centuries

  The aim of this talk is to highlight how the choice and the use of the imprese among the Medici family became a sort of continuing thread from the first generations of the family and their successors. The main focus of the talk will be the decorative apparatus of the Medicean Villa of Poggio a Caiano and the key role of the devices. The talk will first introduce...

9

Matthew Paris and others now in Digitised Armorials list

The manuscript London, British Library, Royal MS 14 C VII is now added to the Digitised Armorials list. The manuscript contains the entire Historia Anglorum (covering 1066-1253) and the last part of the Chronica Majora (covering 1254-1259). It is identified as an autograph of Matthew Paris (d. 1259), monk in the abbey of St. Albans. The manuscript contains coats of arms in the margins, 95 in total[1]. These make...

0

[Paper:] Silvia Marin Barutcieff, Ștefan Barutcieff (Bucharest, RO): From Sacred Art to the Art of Politics. Mural Paintings and the 15th Century Iconographic Discourse of St. George’s Castle in Mantua

In 1433, Gianfrancesco Gonzaga became the first marquess of Mantua, a title granted by Emperor Sigismund in recognition of his services to the Holy Roman Empire. Succeeding his father, Ludovico III Gonzaga ruled the Lombard city from 1444 to 1478, as the second marquess of Mantua. Having completed his education in the company of outstanding figures (such as the humanist Vittorino Rambaldini da Feltre, his tutor), Ludovico invited at...

0

[Paper:] Elizabeth Biggs, James Hillson (Cambridge, UK): A Palace Chapel as State-Room at Westminster, 1348-1450

In 1348 St Stephen’s Chapel was completed.  Sited in the centre of the Palace of Westminster, the blank walls of the new building presented Edward III with an opportunity to create a new iconography of kingship. Between 1348 and 1363 the king and his craftsmen transformed the chapel’s surface into one of the most elaborate royal decorative programmes of the fourteenth century, including painted masonry, Old Testament narratives, sculptures,...

0

[Paper:] Isabel Monteiro (Lisbon): Music in Portuguese Renaissance Courts: Performers, Contexts and Places

The expression ‘heraldic music’ has been used to describe musical bands of a significant number of trumpets, kettle drums and shawms suitable to accompany solemn courtly and other ceremonial events, although we do not know much about the music they actually played. It is certainly not necessary to remind the fact that no great lord did not make use of music to present his class and power, standing in...

0

[Paper:] Nuno Senos (Lisbon): The Great Hall of the Ducal Palace of Vila Viçosa

From the 1530s to the 1560s, duke Teodosio de Bragança conducted a series of major construction campaigns in his family’s palace in Vila Viçosa providing the building with a new wing faced with a splendid marble façade (the first secular renaissance façade in the country) and a series of new rooms. Among these, a monumental staircase leads to an also new great hall of grand proportions, decorated with expensive...