Category: Projects

4

Das “Performanz der Wappen”-Projekt auf dem Historikertag 2016 (#Histag16)

Morgen startet in Hamburg der 51. Deutsche Historikertag. Auch unser von der VolkswagenStiftung gefördertes Projekt “Die Performanz der Wappen” wird mit dabei sein. Und das gleich doppelt. Zum einen wird Elmar Hofman im Rahmen der Posterausstellung des Doktorandenforums sein Dissertationsprojekt zu mittelalterlichen Wappenbüchern vorstellen. Zum anderen organisiere ich gemeinsam mit Mareike König (DHI Paris) eine Sektion und eine Posterausstellung/-session zum Thema “Was sind Digital Humanities”. Bei der Posterausstellung bin ich auch mit einem eigenen...

2

„Jenseitsvorsorge und ständische Repräsentation. Interdisziplinäre Erschließung der spätmittelalterlichen Totenschilde im Germanischen Nationalmuseum“ – Aktuelle Zwischenergebnisse

Das Germanische Nationalmuseum besitzt mit rund 150 Totenschilden des 14. bis 17. Jahrhunderts den größten museal verwahrten Bestand einer Gattung, die bislang nur wenig erforscht und in der Vergangenheit vornehmlich für genealogische Studien herangezogen wurde. Es handelt sich um Gedenktafeln, die die städtischen Eliten für ihre männlichen Verstorbenen in den Kirchen, wenn möglich in der Nähe des Grabes, aufhängten. Sie zeigen das Familienwappen und weisen eine Inschrift mit dem...

0

The Heraldry of the Weavers’ Guild of Augsburg: Mythical Origins and Everyday Display of Corporate Heraldry in Clemens Jäger’s ‘Weberchronik’

Clemens Jäger’s Weberchronik [1], a sixteenth-century chronicle dedicated to the history of the weavers’ guild of Augsburg, is a formidable example to demonstrate how urban chronicles can be used to analyse the importance of heraldry in urban society, especially in terms of coats of arms as an element of civic identity and collective representation. In this blog post, I am not so much interested in the heraldic illuminations that...

17

Heraldry as a Systematic and International Language? About the Limitations of Blazonry in Describing Coats of Arms

Usually, this blog is dedicated to approaches to heraldic sources from the perspective of cultural history. To the contrary, this post will deal with one of the central subjects of heraldry as an auxiliary science: blazoning. However, I do think that this does preclude interesting insights also from the perspective of cultural studies, since I am convinced that heraldry as such can also be studied from this perspective. As...

9

The material of the Berry armorial

This is the second post in the series on armorials, in which each time a manuscript from the digitized armorials list will be highlighted (click here for the list). The armorial will not be treated in full, but specific aspects, problems or ideas will be discussed. Your thoughts on these issues are valuable and therefore you are more than welcome to share your ideas and comments.   Paris, BnF,...

5

[Report:] Heraldry in Medieval and Early Modern State-Rooms, Münster 16-18 March

On 16-18 March 2016 the workshop Heraldry in Medieval and Early Modern State-Rooms took place in Münster. The origins of this workshop lay in the challenges of understanding the function of the heraldic display in one particular state-room: the sala dos brasões of the National Palace in Sintra, Portugal, dating from the early sixteenth century. The ceiling of this hall presents the coats of arms of the Portuguese royal...

0

[Project:] Heraldry, politics and art: The Order of the Golden Fleece

PhD thesis drs. Marjolijn Kruip, Radboud University Nijmegen, department of Art History   The Order of the Golden Fleece In 1430 the Burgundian duke Philip the Good founded the Order of the Golden Fleece to promote and defend Christianity. This knightly order also institutionalised the duke’s aims in being a Christian ruler (a king) in an expanding Christian domain, e.g. by planning a new crusade. The Order of the...

0

[Paper:] History on the Walls and Windows to the Past: Heraldic Commemoration of Urban Identity in Late Medieval Town Halls (Marcus Meer)

In medieval town halls, coats of arms were a prominent visual means of expressing urban (civic) identity. A core element of this identity was the commemoration of an urban history that was not at all limited to the texts of city chronicles. To the contrary, in this presentation I will explore the commemorative function of heraldic signs as part of urban material and visual culture in German and English...

0

The Grünenberg armorial and seven of its copies: an assessment of the mutual dependency

Thanks to Heraldica Nova, we are witnesses of one of the most surprising findings in the modern research of medieval heraldry. It is now clear that the famous armorial of Conrad Grünenberg, which is carefully preserved in the Geheimes Staatsarchiv of Preussischer Kulturbesitz in Berlin (GStA PK VIII. HA, II 21) was not copied only once, as was generally accepted until recently, but that there exist several copies of...

0

Programme: Heraldry in Medieval and Early Modern State-Rooms: Towards a Typology of Heraldic Programmes in Spaces of Self-Representation – Münster, Germany, 16-18 March 2016

Heraldry was an ubiquitous element of state-rooms. Whether in palaces of kings and princes, castles of noblemen, residences of patricians, city halls or in cathedral chapters, heraldic display was a crucial element in the visual programme of these spaces. Despite its omnipresence, however, heraldic display in state-rooms remains largely understudied so far. Given the fundamental role of heraldry in medieval and early modern visual communication, it seems essential to...

2

A new Grünenberg copy from Brno

Konrad Grünenberg (d. 1494) is rightly famous for having had one of the greatest armorials of the Middle Ages. For a long time now, heraldists, art historians and (increasingly) historians have studied Grünenberg’s great work, but only recently the popularity of this giant collection of coat of arms has become evident, as new copies were discovered. If you want to learn about these discoveries, look no further than the...

3

A treasure hidden in plain sight. The armorial behind the Schichtbuch

This is the first post in a new series on armorials, in which each time a manuscript from the digitized armorials list will be highlighted (click here for the list). The armorial will not be treated in full, but specific aspects, problems or ideas will be discussed. Your thoughts on these issues are valuable and therefore you are more than welcome to share your ideas and comments. Manuscript The...