Tagged: 15th c.

2

‘Heraldic Artists and Painters’ volume is now forthcoming!

I am pleased to announce that the first volume of our new ‘Heraldic Studies’ series has now been sent off to the printers and will be published just in time for Christmas! Under the title ‘Heraldic Artists and Painters in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times’, Laurent Hablot and I present a collection of fourteen English and French papers bringing together contributions from our Poitiers conference in 2014...

3

A few more armorials online (Mandragore database)

The Mandragore database of the Bibliothèque national in Paris (http://mandragore.bnf.fr/jsp/rechercheExperte.jsp) allows one to search images of the BnF’s illuminated manuscripts. Unsurprisingly perhaps, this also brings to light a rather larger number of heraldic images (some 10,000 images are tagged ‘armoiries’) and at least a few armorials: 18 manuscripts in the database have been described as armorials (i.e. have the word ‘armorial’ in the modern title). Here’s a list: 1...

9

Wappenbuch BSB Cgm 8030 online

Unter den Neuzugängen der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek (BSB) findet man das Wappenbuch Cgm 8030. Es ist eines der größten mittelalterlichen Wappenbücher (359 Blätter, ca. 2811 erhaltene Wappen, mindestens 38 nicht mehr erhalten, über 100 leere Schilde) und war bisher weder den Forschern bekannt noch in der Fachliteratur zitiert. Es besteht aus vielen Segmenten, aber außer der Lage, die 4 Blätter zählt, wurde es nach den vorab bestimmten Kriterien in einer...

0

Nassau-Vianden armorial accessible online!

Earlier this year the Koninklijke Bibliotheek in The Hague acquired the Nassau-Vianden armorial. This fascinating manuscript is now digitized and accessible online at the website of the Koninklijke Bibliotheek. On this website the presentation of the armorial is accompanied by an introduction and some details on the content, of which a brief summary follows below. The armorial displays the ancestors of count Engelbrecht II of Nassau (1451-1504), of both the...

4

A world (map) of coat of arms: Richental’s mappamundi

The Aulendorf copy of Richental’s chronicle, today preserved in New York, is rightly famous as an important textual witness not only of the chronicle but also the armorial transmitted with the latter (see https://heraldica.hypotheses.org/2854 on the manuscript and the coats of arms it contains). Today, I would like to draw attention to a slightly hidden feature of the Aulendorf manuscript, namely the mappamundi it contains – a so-called ‘T-O...

0

[Paper:] Isabel Monteiro (Lisbon): Music in Portuguese Renaissance Courts: Performers, Contexts and Places

The expression ‘heraldic music’ has been used to describe musical bands of a significant number of trumpets, kettle drums and shawms suitable to accompany solemn courtly and other ceremonial events, although we do not know much about the music they actually played. It is certainly not necessary to remind the fact that no great lord did not make use of music to present his class and power, standing in...

4

[Paper:] Torsten Hiltmann: Heraldry and Materiality – Oxford, 1 March 2017

In recent years the concept of materiality has become more and more important in historical research. In going beyond the study of texts and images, scholarship now also addresses the materiality of their media, as well as the role physical objects may have played in different historical settings. This talk will explore the relationship between coats of arms and the concept of materiality. First, the talk will focus on...

1

L’héraldique sculptée à Florence 1400-1530: À propos de la thèse de doctorat soutenu par Anne-Laure Connesson en décembre dernier

Le 2 décembre dernier, Anne-Laure Connesson soutenait à l’Université d’Amiens une thèse pour le doctorat d’histoire de l’art moderne dirigée par le professeur Philippe Sénéchal et consacrée a l’héraldique sculptée à Florence 1400-1530. Ce sujet inédit est aussi un sujet d’histoire de l’art consacré à l’héraldique, exercice rarissime qui est aussi la preuve que les temps changent. Ce travail d’Anne-Laure Connesson donne raison à l’article de Francis Salet « emblématique...

0

[Paper:] Lucie Jardot: Les sceaux des comtesses de Flandre et de Hainaut (XIIIe-XVe siècles). Des représentations princières au pouvoir politique, le discours par l’image et ses problématiques matrimoniales – Paris, 16 février 2017

Comme la plupart des femmes de leur rang, les comtesses de Flandre et de Hainaut, se dotent à l’occasion de leur mariage d’un sceau les représentant, jusqu’au milieu du XIVème siècle, en pieds accostées des armes de leur père et de leur époux. Après cette période on assiste à la modification de ce modèle. Dès lors, ce type de figuration est abandonné au profit de l’héraldique. Cette intervention est...

6

The baron who became an architect: (mis-)remembering Konrad Grünenberg (d. 1494)

Konrad Grünenberg (d. 1494) and his armorial for a long time have attracted the attention of heraldists; in the late 19th c. in particular, his work was praised by German heraldists as one of the most important medieval armorials, if not the greatest armorial ever. At Konstanz, he was remembered as well; several local historians studied his life and works, and a small street was named after him. The...

0

[Paper:] Display, Deface, Destroy: Heraldische Kommunikation als Medium adeliger Repräsentation und städtischen Protests – Münster, 01.02.2017

Obwohl die Heraldik in der öffentlichen Wahrnehmung beinahe exklusiv in den Sphären von Rittertum und Adel verortet zu sein scheint, waren Wappen doch auch in der Stadt des Mittelalters ein allgegenwärtiger Anblick. Stadtbürger waren von ihrem Gebrauch keineswegs ausgeschlossen: Tatsächlich zierten die Wappen der Bürgerfamilien und ihrer korporativen Zusammenschlüsse wie Gilden, Bruderschaften und, in Gestalt des Stadtwappens, der Bürgergemeinschaft selbst in vielerlei Form die Türme und Tore, Rat-, Zunft-...

1

Show me a coat-of-arms: The Lyncenich armorial.

Elmar Hofman recently summarized a number of research problems concerning medieval armorials, among which were: by whom and for what purpose(s) were they made (https:/heraldica.hypotheses.org/4901 on 20/09/2016)? Though I know that Elmar does put great importance on knowing both content and context of any armorial studied, I felt that for the casual reader, he somewhat underplayed the descriptive work needed before any serious discussion can take place. That was...