Tagged: England

0

[Paper:] Heraldic Display on the Castles of “New Men” in the Late Middle Ages (Audrey Thorstad)

Past scholarship has argued that the new men of the Tudor dynasty represented themselves through to use of newly acquired heraldic devices to match their newly bestowed titles. Recently, however it has been shown that these newly created men were using royal heraldry on their residences. This identified them as loyal subjects to the king, but there is more to these outward displays of loyalty. Men such as Sir...

0

[Paper:] History on the Walls and Windows to the Past: Heraldic Commemoration of Urban Identity in Late Medieval Town Halls (Marcus Meer)

In medieval town halls, coats of arms were a prominent visual means of expressing urban (civic) identity. A core element of this identity was the commemoration of an urban history that was not at all limited to the texts of city chronicles. To the contrary, in this presentation I will explore the commemorative function of heraldic signs as part of urban material and visual culture in German and English...

2

[Project:] Heraldry and Urban Visual Culture in Late Medieval England and Germany

The medieval city was a stage of heraldry: It was displayed on the city gates and towers, the façades of the burghers’ houses and the merchants’ and craftsmen’s shops, on the ceilings and walls of the town hall, the stained glass and epitaphs of the city’s churches, the commune’s seals and coins. It was part of the visual programme of urban rituals such as the ruler’s entry, civic processions,...

0

Shield of Light: The Making and Logic of Heraldic Schemes in English Medieval Stained Glass c.1380-1560 – Oliver Fearon (York)

The planning and making of series of heraldic shields in medieval England is likely to have confronted medieval artists and patrons with unusual demands. As images that brought with them the weight of ancestral history, the commissioning of heraldic projects might require a patron’s historical and genealogical knowledge as much as the skills of medieval craftsmen for the fashioning of heraldic blazon in its physical form. The importance of...

8

Die Wappen des Konstanzer Konzils in der Welt

Richentals Chronik des Konstanzer Konzils ist sicher die bekannteste Quelle zum Constantiense, und um so erstaunlicher ist es, dass das in mehreren frühen und wichtigen Abschriften dieser Chronik enthaltene Wappenbuch bislang so wenig Aufmerksamkeit gefunden hat, wie Tina Raddatz gerade geschrieben hat. Das Wappenbuch der Richentalchronik ist aber nicht die einzige heraldische Quelle zum Konstanzer Konzil. Werner Paravicini hat schon ein vor einigen Jahren [1] auf drei weitere Handschriften...

0

Review on T. Huthwelker, Die Darstellung des Rangs in Wappen und Wappenrollen published on H-Soz-u-Kult

My review on Thorsten Huthwelker’s study on the representation of rank in late medieaval coats of arms and armorials has been published yesterday on H-Soz-u-Kult, the central online information and communication platform for historians in the German-speaking area. In his study, Thorsten Huthwelker tries to answer the questions “In what way did coats of arms could reveal the rang of their bearer?” and “To what extent did medieval armorials...

0

Roland, Martin (Vienna): Illuminated charters, heraldry and artistic excellence

Artistic quality is not necessary in order to be considered a good heraldic painter. Too much creative transformation is not what a patron seeks when he orders a coat of arms. Such is the standard opinion, and this is true within the field of illuminated charters as well. But standard explanations are never sufficient for artefacts of the highest rank. And this also holds good for the field I...

0

Research project: Heraldic Display and Discourse in the Early Modern Monarchy, 16th-17th Centuries

Summary The present project investigates the role of heraldry in the political culture and political representation of the early modern monarchy. It studies monarchical armorial symbolism as a dynamic visual code that was constantly reinterpreted to serve specific needs and circumstances. The royal monopolization of that visual code interfaced with the abstract notions of ‘authority’, ‘sovereignty’ and ‘dynasty’. In the process, it contributed significantly to the establishment of the...

0

Thorsten Huthwelker: Die Darstellung des Rangs in Wappen und Wappenrollen des späten Mittelalters (engl.: Study on the representation of rank in late medieaval coats of arms and armorials, forthcoming in July 2013)

Thorsten Huthwelker’s book on the representation of rank in late medieval coats of arms and armorials will soon be published at Thorbecke. I suppose it will resume his studies in the context of the ERC project “Rank and order: The Formation and Visualisation of the Social and Political Order of Princes in late Medieval Europe” under the direction of Jörg Peltzer at the University of Heidelberg (more details). In...

0

James Hillson (York): Hagiographical Heraldry and the Plantagenets – St George, Edward the Confessor and the Arms of England circa 1259-1363

At the battle of Crecy in 1347 the English army fought as it had since Edward I under five banners: two were secular, the dragon standard and the royal arms, but the majority were hagiographical – the arms of Saints George, Edward the Confessor and Edmund the Martyr.  In both peace and war the later Plantagenet Kings persistently utilised the visual relationship between themselves and the heraldry of their...