Heraldica Nova Blog

Visible Identites conference, London. (2017) 0

[Report:] Visible Identities: Symbolic Codes from Personal Heraldry to Corporate Logos, London, 6 November 2017

It is a convenient coincidence that an event of this thematic scope took place in London, a city that is home to the College of Arms as the oldest authority of heraldry as a century-old tradition of visual identification on the one, and the headquarters of countless companies concerned with identity of modern global brands on the other side. With these two dimensions in mind, this symposium brought together...

2

‘Heraldic Artists and Painters’ volume is now forthcoming!

I am pleased to announce that the first volume of our new ‘Heraldic Studies’ series has now been sent off to the printers and will be published just in time for Christmas! Under the title ‘Heraldic Artists and Painters in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times’, Laurent Hablot and I present a collection of fourteen English and French papers bringing together contributions from our Poitiers conference in 2014...

3

A few more armorials online (Mandragore database)

The Mandragore database of the Bibliothèque national in Paris (http://mandragore.bnf.fr/jsp/rechercheExperte.jsp) allows one to search images of the BnF’s illuminated manuscripts. Unsurprisingly perhaps, this also brings to light a rather larger number of heraldic images (some 10,000 images are tagged ‘armoiries’) and at least a few armorials: 18 manuscripts in the database have been described as armorials (i.e. have the word ‘armorial’ in the modern title). Here’s a list: 1...

Lamp from the emir Aydakin Al Bunduqdar’s mausoleum. 12

The Mamluk rank: Quasi-heraldic emblems in the Islamic world

In Islamic culture, ‘mamluks’ were elite slave soldiers that served the Muslim caliphs, sultans and emirs. Recruited at a young age from the Turkish tribes of the steppes of central Asia, they first appeared in the ninth century under the Abbasid caliph Al-Mutasim near Baghdad. By the thirteenth century, buying and training mamluks had become a common practice in the Middle East. In Egypt, the first sultan to make...

3

What we have done so far: List of publications and lectures from the “Coats of arms in practice” project

The project “Coats of arms in practice” aims to reassess medieval heraldry from the perspective of cultural history. In order to keep track of the results of the project, we publish here a list of the publications and lectures that emerged from this project so far. Of course, there is still more to come!       Edited Volumes Hiltmann, Torsten; Hablot, Laurent (eds.): Heraldic Artists and Painters in the...

9

Wappenbuch BSB Cgm 8030 online

Unter den Neuzugängen der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek (BSB) findet man das Wappenbuch Cgm 8030. Es ist eines der größten mittelalterlichen Wappenbücher (359 Blätter, ca. 2811 erhaltene Wappen, mindestens 38 nicht mehr erhalten, über 100 leere Schilde) und war bisher weder den Forschern bekannt noch in der Fachliteratur zitiert. Es besteht aus vielen Segmenten, aber außer der Lage, die 4 Blätter zählt, wurde es nach den vorab bestimmten Kriterien in einer...

0

Nassau-Vianden armorial accessible online!

Earlier this year the Koninklijke Bibliotheek in The Hague acquired the Nassau-Vianden armorial. This fascinating manuscript is now digitized and accessible online at the website of the Koninklijke Bibliotheek. On this website the presentation of the armorial is accompanied by an introduction and some details on the content, of which a brief summary follows below. The armorial displays the ancestors of count Engelbrecht II of Nassau (1451-1504), of both the...

Visible Identites conference, London. (2017) 0

[CfA:] Visible Identities: Symbolic Codes from Personal Heraldry to Corporate Logos, London, 6 November 2017 (Programme)

This day conference at the Society of Antiquaries will consider the ways in which identity since c. 1100 has been, and continues to be, expressed in outward visible formats, principally heraldry. The opening address will be delivered by Claire Boudreau, Chief Herald of Canada, on development of the country’s visual symbolic identity. The following contributions will consider the development of sign systems of identity and their uses from the...

5

Bellenville’s two armorials

The »Bellenville« armorial is one of the most famous and admired of the Middle Ages. Its production context however remains shrouded in mystery. This brief blogpost discusses the relations between its two main sections and demonstrates how focus on the material aspects of the manuscript can clarify a somewhat confusing statement in the most recent heraldic edition of the armorial. The manuscript The manuscript with the »Bellenville« armorial consists...

0

Out now! Editing armorials. Cooperation, knowledge and approach by late medieval practitioners

The title of these books can be interpreted both actively and passively. The active form is when one or more manuscripts are being transcribed, the arms identified and commented on, and the whole analyzed and published. Less effort may suffice and leave the armorial as just a listing of transcribed items with or without identification. More or less critical editions have been published over the years and more are...

0

Heraldry in the royal palace of Sintra: ‘In the Service of the Crown’ project on national TV in Portugal

The show Visita Guiada (‘Guided Visit’) by Portuguese journalist Paula Moura Pinheiro is currently the most popular program of Portugal’s public broadcasting channel RTP 2. Every week, a Portuguese monument of cultural importance is presented by a specialist, generally a historian. Last week, the chosen monument was the royal palace in Sintra and its sala dos brasões (‘hall of coats of arms’). It was presented by Miguel Metelo de...

2

[CfA:] You can contribute to Heraldica Nova, too!

We are very happy to say that Heraldica Nova is becoming more and more popular amongst the international community of heraldists, historians, and enthusiasts engaging with heraldry in the medieval and early-modern era. In March, we were able to welcome over 9,000 unique visitors! Of course, this interest would not be possible without the fascinating contributions and invaluable comments of people  from around the world that have made Heraldic...